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Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Wed Nov 07, 2018 4:50 am
by SACHA
Hi folks!

I've used this forum to gather info for my first trip to NZ 🇳🇿 and can only thank the people who have made this an excellent resource!

I'm coming over in a few days time to fish and travel about the south island staying in campsites and DOC huts. In terms of wet wading for multiple days in a row, how have you guys experienced it and what's the best way to take care of your feet?

I'll be wearing wading boots and simms guard neoprene socks with thin cotton socks underneath (I also have sealskinz socks but undecided on best combination for tramping and wading then more tramping.

I've read that putting hot wet socks on in the morning is better than cold socks (boil them first) also some people putting moisturiser on before bed after letting your feet dry completely out in the evenings.

Looking forward to hearing people's preferences on how they go about doing this as I know most people only wet wade for the day then it's another few days before there out fishing again so not an issue for most.

Thanks!

Sacha

Re: Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Wed Nov 07, 2018 10:31 am
by Jaapie
Ah mate, you do it often enough, the feet just start to web and you don't worry.

Seriously though, just dry your feet at the end of the day and let them breathe.
I just put a pair of dry socks on at the end of the day for the sandflies and a bit of comfort.

What's this about boiling socks? A pot of fungus tea before heading out.......
Sounds like some Russian witchcraft to me.

Just put your socks on that you've hung up over night or if you're lucky, a new pair and get on with it.
If they are a little wet, take a concrete pill to harden up - works a treat.........especially when they are a little frozen in winter, but I don't think you'll be having that problem in the next few months.

Re: Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Wed Nov 07, 2018 3:29 pm
by fraser hocks
Yip as Jaapie said. Plenty of old wife's tails about having wet feet causes all kinds of things, but in god knows how many years of doing this the only bad thing iv had is stinky feet...... and boy do my feet stink!!! Most guides are wet wadding and entire season and therefore their feet are wet at least 5 days a week and they don't have any issues. I fished a month solid once with no ill side affects.....other than being the happiest man on the face of the plant :D

The stinky foot thing is something that I'm specifically talented at, so I hold little hope at you being able to outdo me on that one :lol: I can empty a car of hardened southern pig hunters if I take my socks off in the car after a day on the hoof fishing! A trick I have discovered is to wash my liner socks and neoprene wading socks out in the river the MOMENT I take them off. I think its something to do with the cold water knocking the stinky bacteria on the head, but what ever way it prevents my mates having to have the car windows down the whole drive home and them wanting to barf. :lol: :lol:

Re: Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Wed Nov 07, 2018 8:34 pm
by Johnno
If they are a little wet, take a concrete pill to harden up - works a treat.........especially when they are a little frozen in winter, but I don't think you'll be having that problem in the next few months.

Yeh but wait a few years and the circulation issues and varicose veins..

wet wading in winter is just plain stupid.

Alright when young but you’ll pay dearly later in life....

I know this.... :ugeek:

Re: Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 5:01 am
by SACHA
Cheers for the reassurance gentlemen! I think talking to too many females back home discouraged me but I now know it shouldn't be an issue if I look after my feet at night.
Good shout washing the socks and neoprene socks straight after, I can imagine a build up of sweat over days and days turning into a stinkie situation...
I'll hopefully post some more on this forum in the coming weeks.
Cheers!

Re: Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 8:57 am
by fraser hocks
No problems Sacha. Look forward to hearing how you go on your trip.

Yea Johnno. Couldn't agree more. A couple of seasons back, I got frost nip in my toes. Its essentially the start of frost bite. I came back from a long cold day swinging fly's and couldn't feel my toes. Jumped in a hot shower and my toes turned purple like plumbs (not a joke). The tips of two of my toes went black and eventually big circular lumps of dead flesh fell of. Iv been careful since, but I'm considering a pair of heated footbed's to go in my boots, for future winters. A friend who is a nurse said I was lucky and it could have been a lot worse.

Re: Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 9:22 am
by Maniototoflyfisher
Fraser - that toe thing must be the reason I stop chasing trout in the winter and start chasing quail 😎

Re: Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 2:19 am
by scotish wildfisher
Hi wet wading is fine if its warm enough but the weather is a bit variable before xmas.If its only 13 degrees and pouring with rain all day youll wish you brought your waders.I usually bring them incase I need them and maybe take them off in the afternoon when you warm up.You may have to work out if you need insoles to account for having neoprene socks.If your using huts then you might have space for them because your not a tent etc

Re: Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 2:24 am
by scotish wildfisher
oh forgot to say definitely have a second dry pair for longer walks between huts.Are you going to take one pair of footwear or carry another. The quest to find the one shoe /boot for tramping and wading is long and full of blisters!

Re: Footcare when wetwading

Posted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:53 pm
by SACHA
I've fished almost a week now and feet are fine. Apart from the sandfly bites!! Must remember to keep feet covered at nights when wearing sandals.

Scottish wild Fisher. Sorry my private message reply to you is just ending up in my outbox rather than sending for whatever reason... Possibly because I'm on a mobile but not sure how that would cause an issue.