CICADAS

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Maniototoflyfisher
Posts: 128
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2017 6:30 pm

Re: CICADAS

Post by Maniototoflyfisher » Sat Feb 20, 2021 4:04 pm

Just spend the day at another dam between home and Alexandra - perfect day - hot with afternoon breeze - when I arrived 9.30am was rippled with odd calm patch - hopped into the kayak and 100m off shore in calm patch saw trout rise a few times (to midges or craneflies - both on surface) but by time I got there the ripple had returned and never saw another rise - that was the only trout I saw for the day😫 only saw 1 cicada on the water as well😩



icthusiast
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat May 10, 2014 11:41 pm

Re: CICADAS

Post by icthusiast » Sat Feb 20, 2021 6:20 pm

I was out for a wander up one of the Hutt tributaries today and the cicada song was deafening! :D

I'm not sure why there's nothing much going on down in the main valley but off the beaten track was very encouraging.

Plenty of cicadas but not many fish! Only saw two all day and me and my mate had one failure each!! :roll:

Ah well, there'll be another day...


All the best
GarthS
<"}}}><\

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TIDDLER
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Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2015 5:42 pm

Re: CICADAS

Post by TIDDLER » Tue Feb 23, 2021 11:05 am

THE LORD WORKS IN MYSTERIOUS WAYS - SO DO CICADAS ! I LOOKED AT THE FORECAST LAST WK - NOTED SEVERAL HOT DAYS AHEAD WITH WARM NIGHTS. I LEFT THE WKEND FOR THE WORKERS AND BESIDES I HAD TO SEE THE YACHTING.
MONDAY - STILL HOT - WENT TO A FAVOURITE HOLE IN MY FAV PUDDLE . OFFSHORE WIND WITH A LOT OF TUSSOCK BEHIND ME . VERY FEW (5) CICADAS ON WATER . LANDED 1 FISH ON "DAVE'S HOPPER" AFTER SHE REFUSED IT WITH 3 FAKE TAKES. REST OF DAY USING ALL (usually successful) CICADA PATTERNS - SAW A FEW REFUSALS - NO TAKES. ONLY A COUPLE OF PROPER RISES OUT FURTHER.
ALSO - NEXT TO NO OTHER INSECT LIFE - NO DAMSELS !
WHATS GOING ON ? DAVE (manio) HAS LOTS OF CICADAS ON HIS PUDDLE ON THE 18th AND YET I GET ZILCH THIS SEASON . THESE LAKES ARE NOT FAR APART AS THE SEAGULL FLIES (when Daves not catching them :P ).
TO MY KNOWLEDGE THE WEATHER HAS BEEN VERY SIMILAR AND THE SAME INSECT - KIKIHIA ANGUSTUS . WHY HAVE THEY EMERGED ON 1 LAKE AND NOT ON THE OTHER ??
THE TROUT HAVE NOT HAD A CHANCE TO GET ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT CICADA THIS SEASON .
I'M NOT A FAN OF THESE MYSTERIOUS WAYS :? .
AL.



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TIDDLER
Posts: 302
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2015 5:42 pm

Re: CICADAS

Post by TIDDLER » Tue Feb 23, 2021 11:56 am

THE CICADA'S NAME SHOULD HAVE READ KIKIHIA ANGUSTA

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File ... ateral.jpg



Maniototoflyfisher
Posts: 128
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2017 6:30 pm

Re: CICADAS

Post by Maniototoflyfisher » Tue Feb 23, 2021 1:30 pm

Hi TIDDLER - isn't it infuriating when in February the conditions seem ideal for cicada emergence and nothing happens!! Fortunately, for at least the past 5 days, my local puddle has produced lots of cicadas and rising trout - I only had one day there but have had reports from others of great fishing. Hard to know why/how it differs from your puddle given that they are close.



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TIDDLER
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Re: CICADAS

Post by TIDDLER » Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:39 pm

THIS IS NOT A HUGE HELP BUT GIVES US A LITTLE INSIGHT AS TO THEIR EMERGENCE CYCLE ...

Forum-The ecology of sub-alpine cicadas
Barratt (1983) has surveyed the abundance of "tussock grassland cicadas" across a range of grassland types, altitudes, and aspects near Millers Flat, Otago, but little is known of the life-cycle
biology or ecology of New Zealand cicadas, apart from the widespread "grass cicada" Kikihia muta (F.). Cumber (1952), using the name Melampsalta cruentata (see Fleming & Scott 1970), demonstrated at a lowland site that K. muta has overwintering eggs, five nymphal instars, and a variable life-cycle of 3(+) years. He also recorded population variation in the soil-dwelling nymphs by sampling two contiguous vegetation types. His results showed that: (1) later instar nymphs were more abundant among the large succulent roots of Phormium sp.(p.) (Phormiaceae) than below pasture grasses 0.6 m distant; and (2) fifth instar nymphs below Phormium were significantly larger (P < 0.001) than those below pasture grasses.
Twenty years later in the same site environs, Fleming & Scott (1970) sampled male K. muta adults and found a significantly larger body size in individuals that had fed below Phormium (P < 0.001), thus extending the demonstration of a pronounced size bimodality across the two feeding classes. It therefore appears likely that the lateral movement of nymphs through soil is frequently localised within the root zones of individual plants and does not extend to neighbouring plants. Ifother non-forest cicada species have similarly restricted movement, it follows that the spatial distributions of nymph emergence holes and ecdysal skins may approximate the distributions of host plants in mixed shrub-grassland, as in forest (e.g., Dybas & Lloyd 1962).

• "Instar describes an immature arthropod between moults.
◦ For example, after hatching from its egg an insect is said to be in its first instar. When the insect moults it is then a second instar and so on."
From The Amateur Entomologists' Society Glossary (Feb. 2016)
 AL.



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